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Arduino UNO R3/MEGA 2560 R3 Project 20: 1602 LCD

Posted by Fiona Su on

Introduction

In this experiment, we use an Arduino to drive the 1602 LCD. 1602 LCD has wide applications. In the beginning,1602 LCD uses a HD44780 controller. Now, almost all 1602 LCD module uses a compatible IC, but their features are basically the same.

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1602LCD Parameters:

  • Display Capacity: 16 × 2 characters
  • Chip Operating Voltage: 4.5 ~ 5.5V
  • Working Current: 2.0mA (5.0V)
  • Optimum working voltage of the module is 5.0V
  • Character Size: 2.95 * 4.35 (W * H) mm

Pin Description of 1602 LCD:

thumb

No. Mark Pin Description
No.
Mark Pin Description
1 VSS Power GND 9 D2 Date I/O
2 VDD Power Positive 10 D3 Date I/O
3 VL LCD Voltage Bias Signal 11 D4 Date I/O
4 RS Select data/command(V/L) 12 D5 Date I/O
5 R/W Select read/write(H/L) 13 D6 Date I/O
6 E Enable Signal 14
D7
Date I/O
7 D0 Date I/O 15 BLA Back Light Power Positive
8 D1 Date I/O 16 BLK Back Light Power Negative


Interface Description:
1. two power sources, one for module power, another one for backlight, generally use 5V. In this project, we use 3.3V for backlight.
2. VL is the pin for adjusting contrast ratio; it usually connects a potentiometer(no more than 5KΩ) in series for its adjustment. In this experiment, we use a 1KΩ resistor. For the connection, it has 2 methods, namely high potential and low potential. Here, we use low potential method; connect the resistor and then the GND.
3. RS is a very common pin in LCD. It's a selecting pin for command/data. When the pin is in high level, it's in data mode; when it's in low level, it's in command mode.
4. RW pin is also very common in LCD. It's a selecting pin for read/write. When the pin is in high level, it's in read operation; when it's in low level, it's in write operation.
5. E pin is also very common in LCD. Usually, when the signal in the bus is stabilized, it sends out a positive pulse requiring read operation. When this pin is in high level, the bus is not allowed to have any change.
6. D0-D7 is 8-bit bidirectional parallel bus, used for command and data transmission.
7. BLA is anode for back light; BLK, cathode for back light.

4 Basic Operations of 1602LCD:

Read status input RS=L, R/W=H, E=H output D0-D7=status word
Write command input RS=L, R/W=H, D0-D7=command code, E=high pulse output none
Read data input RS=H, R/W=H, E=H output D0-D7=data
Write data input RS=H, R/W=L, D0-D7=data, E=high pulse output none

Hardware Required:

  • 1 * Controller board
  • 1 * 1602 LCD
  • 1 * Breadboard
  • 1 * potentiometer
  • 1 * USB cable
  • 16 *Jumper wires

Connection & Sample Program:

1602 can directly communicate with Arduino. According to the product manual, it has two connection methods, namely 8-bit connection and 4-bit connection.
8-bit connection method:

thumb

Connection for REV4:

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Connection for 2560 R3:

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Sample Code A:

int DI = 12;
int RW = 11;
int DB[] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};// use array to select pin for bus
int Enable = 2;

void LcdCommandWrite(int value) {
// define all pins
int i = 0;
for (i=DB[0]; i <= DI; i++) // assign value for bus
{
   digitalWrite(i,value & 01);// for 1602 LCD, it uses D7-D0( not D0-D7) for signal identification; here, it’s used for signal inversion. 
   value >>= 1;
}
digitalWrite(Enable,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(1);
digitalWrite(Enable,HIGH);
delayMicroseconds(1);  // wait for 1ms
digitalWrite(Enable,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(1);  // wait for 1ms
}

void LcdDataWrite(int value) {
// initialize all pins
int i = 0;
digitalWrite(DI, HIGH);
digitalWrite(RW, LOW);
for (i=DB[0]; i <= DB[7]; i++) {
   digitalWrite(i,value & 01);
   value >>= 1;
}
digitalWrite(Enable,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(1);
digitalWrite(Enable,HIGH);
delayMicroseconds(1);
digitalWrite(Enable,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(1);  // wait for 1ms
}

void setup (void) {
int i = 0;
for (i=Enable; i <= DI; i++) {
   pinMode(i,OUTPUT);
}
delay(100);
// initialize LCD after a brief pause
// for LCD control
LcdCommandWrite(0x38);  // select as 8-bit interface, 2-line display, 5x7 character size 
delay(64);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x38);  // select as 8-bit interface, 2-line display, 5x7 character size 
delay(50);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x38);  // select as 8-bit interface, 2-line display, 5x7 character size             
delay(20);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x06);  // set input mode
                         // auto-increment, no display of shifting
delay(20);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x0E);  // display setup
                         // turn on the monitor, cursor on, no flickering
delay(20);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x01);  // clear the scree, cursor position returns to 0
delay(100);                      
LcdCommandWrite(0x80);  //  display setup
                         //  turn on the monitor, cursor on, no flickering

delay(20);                      
}

void loop (void) {
  LcdCommandWrite(0x01);  // clear the scree, cursor position returns to 0  
  delay(10); 
  LcdCommandWrite(0x80+3); 
  delay(10);                     
  // write in welcome message 
  LcdDataWrite('W');
  LcdDataWrite('e');
  LcdDataWrite('l');
  LcdDataWrite('c');
  LcdDataWrite('o');
  LcdDataWrite('m');

  LcdDataWrite('e');
  LcdDataWrite(' ');
  LcdDataWrite('t');
  LcdDataWrite('o');
  delay(10);
  LcdCommandWrite(0xc0+1);  // set cursor position at second line, second position
  delay(10); 
  LcdDataWrite('g');
  LcdDataWrite('e');
  LcdDataWrite('e');
  LcdDataWrite('k');
  LcdDataWrite('-');
  LcdDataWrite('w');
  LcdDataWrite('o');
  LcdDataWrite('r');
  LcdDataWrite('k');
  LcdDataWrite('s');
  LcdDataWrite('h');
  LcdDataWrite('o');
  LcdDataWrite('p');
  delay(5000);
  LcdCommandWrite(0x01);  // clear the screen, cursor returns to 0  
  delay(10);
  LcdDataWrite('I');
  LcdDataWrite(' ');
  LcdDataWrite('a');
  LcdDataWrite('m');
  LcdDataWrite(' ');
  LcdDataWrite('h');
  LcdDataWrite('o');
  LcdDataWrite('n');
  LcdDataWrite('g');
  LcdDataWrite('y');
  LcdDataWrite('i');
  delay(3000);
  LcdCommandWrite(0x02); // set mode as new characters replay old ones, where there is no new ones remain the same
  delay(10);
  LcdCommandWrite(0x80+5); // set cursor position at first line, sixth position
  delay(10);  

  LcdDataWrite('t');
  LcdDataWrite('h');
  LcdDataWrite('e');
  LcdDataWrite(' ');
  LcdDataWrite('a');
  LcdDataWrite('d');
  LcdDataWrite('m');
  LcdDataWrite('i');
  LcdDataWrite('n');
  delay(5000);
}

4-bit connection method:
When using this module, 8-bit connection uses all the digital pins of the Arduino, leaving no pin for sensors. What then? you can use 4-bit connection.
Connection Circuit:
Connection for REV4:

thumb Connection for 2560 R3:

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After the connection, upload below code to the controller board and see how it goes.

Sample Code B:

/*
  LiquidCrystal Library - Hello World

 Demonstrates the use a 16x2 LCD display.  The LiquidCrystal
 library works with all LCD displays that are compatible with the
 Hitachi HD44780 driver. There are many of them out there, and you
 can usually tell them by the 16-pin interface.

 This sketch prints "Hello World!" to the LCD
 and shows the time.

  The circuit:
 * LCD RS pin to digital pin 12
 * LCD Enable pin to digital pin 11
 * LCD D4 pin to digital pin 9
 * LCD D5 pin to digital pin 8
 * LCD D6 pin to digital pin 7
 * LCD D7 pin to digital pin 6
 * LCD R/W pin to ground
 * LCD VSS pin to ground
 * LCD VCC pin to 5V
 * 10K resistor:
 * ends to +5V and ground
 * wiper to LCD VO pin (pin 3)

 Library originally added 18 Apr 2008
 by David A. Mellis
 library modified 5 Jul 2009
 by Limor Fried (http://www.ladyada.net)
 example added 9 Jul 2009
 by Tom Igoe
 modified 22 Nov 2010
 by Tom Igoe

 This example code is in the public domain.

 http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/LiquidCrystal
 */

// include the library code:
#include <LiquidCrystal.h>

// initialize the library with the numbers of the interface pins
LiquidCrystal lcd(12, 11, 9, 8, 7, 6);

void setup() {
  // set up the LCD's number of columns and rows:
  lcd.begin(16, 2);
  // Print a message to the LCD.
  lcd.print("hello, world!");
}

void loop() {
  // set the cursor to column 0, line 1
  // (note: line 1 is the second row, since counting begins with 0):
  lcd.setCursor(0, 1);
  // print the number of seconds since reset:
  lcd.print(millis() / 1000);
}

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